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Audio / Visual Collection

  • CA TWU Coll. 02
  • Collectie
  • [1966-2006]

This collection consists primarily of audio and video cassettes which document the people and events of TWU, including graduation ceremonies, conferences, reports, oral history interviews, presentations by guest speakers, and lectures presented by TWU faculty.
The collection consists of two series:
01: Audio
02: Video

The CDs and DVDs are unprocessed; descriptions have not been added to the online database

TWU Archives

Oral History: Carl Fosmark (Founder) - January 6

Audio 223a consists of the following recording:
Title: Carl Fosmark – “Oral History Interview”
This oral interview runs approximately forty-five minutes and is an informal discussion between Lynn Wilkinson (acting Trinity Western University archivist) and Carl Fosmark in 1983. Carl Fosmark was a member of an Evangelical Free Church committee that was responsible for forming, developing, and instituting what is presently Trinity Western University. The interview begins with an overview of Carl Fosmark’s life from childhood through to high-school. Fosmark was born in Litchville, North Dakota in 1900. When he was six his family moved to Alberta, Canada. It was in Alberta that his family became Christians through the work of an Evangelical Free Church preacher. Fosmark was sixteen at this time. Fosmark completed his high-school and seminary training in Minneapolis, taking his first church in Devil’s Lake, North Dakota in 1921. Visiting Lutheran friends in Oregon, Fosmark began to preach at their church. Through this, Fosmark met a couple who introduced him to their Evangelical Free Church in Canby, Oregon, where he became resident pastor. Soon after, in 1933, Fosmark accepted a call from an Evangelical Free Church in Brooklyn, New York, where he worked as a pastor and met his wife. After a term in New York, Fosmark returned to Alberta and became district superintendent for the Evangelical Free Church in western Canada, whereupon a committee was formed with the purpose of starting a Christian college [ca. 1958]. Fosmark speaks of the history of the Evangelical Free Church, the various debates in deciding the nature of the school, the opposition to it from many Free Church pastors, funding for the school and the eventual establishment of the school as Trinity Junior College. During this time period, Fosmark also describes his various job titles, travels, moves, and the various people with whom he became friends, namely, Cal Hanson, Ron Swanson, and Dave Enarson. [Abstract and transcript provided by Ian Walker, Public History student, 2001
Carl Fosmark was a charter member of the Enchant Church, became a pastor and later, with his wife Bertha, was to give leadership to the Free Church in Canada, becoming its first superintendent.
Fosmark felt strongly that the EFCA should establish a Christian college in Canada, as there were already several good Bible schools in the country.
Transcript of excerpt from approximately [20:10]: Carl Fosmark: … [20:10] while I was district superintendent - that’s when I was invited to join this, group here, this committee that was, had the responsibility of establishing this school.
Interviewer: - In Canada.
Carl Fosmark: In Canada, yes. Trinity Western, or, we called it Trinity Junior College for the first few years. … While I was on that committee, we were, one of the things that we had to decide was, what kind of school are we talking about, or should we be talking about? Well you know one of those sessions, one of those trips out here I was all steamed up over the fact that I was going to try to convince our committee that we should establish a college and not some Bible school. See, there were other Bible schools; one in – Caronport and one in Three Hills and, and so on, so and, and that which got me all steamed up was the fact that I had come home from our conference, I think in Winona Lake, and I stopped off at a certain service station in Saskatchewan right by that school, there, at Briercrest. And a young fellow getting his car greased … and I knew him, so talking to him, he says, “I, I hear that you folks are going to start a school in, in, Canada.” "Well," I said, “we’re talking about it.” And so he says, “Well I hope, I hope it will be a college, a Christian college.” [people talking in background]
And then he said that we had a young fellow here who took his four years of college, or his, no his high school--and then his four yea-, three years of Bible school and then he went off to Saskatoon to the new university there to continue his education and, he wasn’t there very many months before he lost his faith completely.
And so he says, that I could see the need of a Christian college and so – that’s how I came, when I came, I got all steamed up over this idea, we got to have a college, we, we, no need to fool around with anything else, and you know that’s just what, what happened.
I was glad that I at least could have that much to say on that committee…
Interviewer: Did you find that the rest of the committee was –?
Carl Fosmark: Oh yes, and then, and then after, when I told my story why then they, they could see, they could see that my, that that’s what we should do –

TRANSCRIPT COMMENTS & CORRECTIONS
Provided by Tim Dalzell October, 2018
p. 16 - New Norway is in Alberta, and the church is called Highland Park EFC
p. 17 - White Rock is located in British Columbia; Fosmark's son was named Palmer

Lecture: Dave Busby - February 5-6

Audio 16a consists of the following recording:
Title: Dave Busby – “Being a God-Filled Person” / “Come”
Guest speaker, Dave Busby, speaks over two days. The first day focuses on the theme of Jesus building a church out of God-filled people. He then explains the difference between church people and God-filled people. Mr. Busby encourages students to live a God-filled life and experience the River of God. He references Matt. 16:18, Acts 4, Acts 7, Acts 16:22, Acts 16:25, and Acts 19:15. Another voice begins some reminders, apparently not related to Busby’s presentation, but is cut off at [25:55]. The second day, Dave speaks on the importance of ministering to the Lord instead of for Him. Mr. Busby demonstrates this principle in a skit with a student named Sam. He expresses the importance of paying attention to the Lord instead of overlooking him in the pursuit of independence. He argues that independence from the Lord often leads to idolatry. Individuals are looking for a way to quench their inner thirst in all the wrong places and the only true well to drink from is Jesus. He begins to discuss the one good thing about false gods: that they fail. He relates a personal story on this point, but the recording cuts off. He references John 7:37 and John 2.
Audio 16b consists of the following recording:
Title: Dave Busby – “Come” cont’d / “Receiving Jesus”
Guest speaker Dave Busby continues his talk from recording Aud. 16a. This presentation ends at [8:07]. The recording then includes another talk by Busby, this one focusing on the importance of being open to receiving Jesus. He recounts a personal story of seeing a father delighted by his child. This is a pivotal moment in Busby’s life; he realizes that when God looks down on any of His children, He is delighted because that child is His. Busby argues that when Jesus said to come and “drink” that He meant to “receive”. He argues that people don’t receive well, churches teach us to give and receiving seems selfish. He mentions a personal story about a trip to Africa and spending some time around beggars. Busby references 6 verses in Matt. 20. He then speaks to his experiences at the Church of the Open Door and the struggle to overcome his image and pride to let two elderly women pray for him. He overcomes his struggle and the women pray over him, and he feels refreshed in the Lord. Mr. Busby then relates several stories of individuals feeling the touch of God, of having their needs filled when they felt empty. He then takes a few moments to pray and encourages those students who feel needy to come down and pray for the touch of God with him. [Music plays softly and someone sings.]
See also Aud 17
Notes provided by BF, student assistant, 2010/2011
Archivist's note: online sources indicate that Dave Busby passed away in 1997, as a result of chronic health issues

Oral History: David Enarson (Founder and Board member) - July 21

Audio 220a and Audio 220b consist of the following recording:
Title: David Enarson – “Oral history Interview”
Library staff member Lynn Wilkinson’s interview with Dave Enarson essentially covers two broad issues. First, they discuss Enarson’s background in terms of his family, education, and career history. Secondly, they look at the development of Trinity Western, discussing several of its founders, how the land for the campus was selected, and how funds were raised.
Enarson talks about his siblings and what they did career-wise, as well as where they grew up and where they are today. Enarson speaks of his conversion experience, and how he and his first wife met. He also describes his teaching positions, as well as his experiences as a pastor of several churches.
The second half, as mentioned, is a detailed overview of how Enarson and others got the ball rolling in the founding of Trinity Western. Enarson is impressive in recalling all of the names and positions of those with whom he worked in the founding of Trinity.
At this point, Wilkinson shifts into specific questions about the institutional development of Trinity, such as how people were chosen to be board members, and how they decided on the number of board members to have. The last ten minutes of the interview focuses on the first fund-raising meeting that Trinity held. Finally, Enarson compares how smoothly Trinity’s founding went in comparison to the attempted founding of another four-year university in Ontario. [Abstract and transcript provided by Dave Tjoelker, Public History student, 2001]
Transcript of excerpt from approximately [10:29]: And again and again we [the School for Canada Committee] came to this property, first of all through … Henry Friesen, who would take us individually at times and show it to us--he’d taken me here many times. And we were here all together on this day--it was before we had ever made the purchase and … I think we were nine or ten persons that were on campus at the time, and Henry was walking us through, showing us the beauty of the terrain and this sort of thing, and we noticed that Walter Cahill had stopped … I said, “Walter, what it the world are you doing?” He said, “I’m taking the shoes off of my feet; I want to walk on this ground in my stocking feet because I believe I am walking on holy ground. I’m coveting this ground for the Wheaton of Canada.”

TRANSCRIPT COMMENTS & CORRECTIONS
Provided by Tim Dalzell August 2018
p. 2 - Duhamel, AB., is correct
p. 4 - Sexsmith, AB., is correct
p. 10 - Carl Sundholm is correct. He was then residing in Longview, Wn.
Tony Hanson is spelled incorrectly.
Walter Cahill is spelled incorrectly here and p. 14. He was then residing in Seattle.
Will Norton is Wil Norton (actually H. Wilbert Norton who was dean of Wheaton's grad school in '71)
Herb Kyrk is spelled incorrectly. He was the home mission's sec'tary in Mpls
Jim Westman was at Winnipeg and not the BC district
Lester Westland is spelled incorrectly. He was the foreign mission's sec'tary in Mpls.
p. 11 - Charles McGee was pastor in Tacoma
Enoch Mattson was in Harper, Wn.
Ken Loge was in Wainwright, AB.
Olaf Lolund is probably Loland--Bethel FC had a number of Lolands as members in '60

Oral History: Bob Thompson interviewed by Peter Stursberg, C 2874, 2875 cassette 6 - September 23

Digitized sound file not attached, due to copyright restrictions
As part of a joint Oral History project of the Public Archives of Canada and the Parliamentary Library, journalist, writer, and broadcaster Peter Stursberg interviewed former Social Credit leader Robert Thompson in September, 1981.
Title: "Robert N. Thompson - His Memoirs in an interview with Peter Stursberg in Dr. Thompson's office in the Robert N. Thompson Building in Trinity Western College, Langley, British Columbia, September 23, 1981. (This is part of an oral history for the Parliamentary Library and the Public Archives)"
Audio 280a consists of the following recording:
Thompson briefly details some of the personal tragedies that assailed Haile Selassie's family. He then speaks at length about leprosy, and the work he and his wife did at the Leprosarium. He relays the story behind his title, "the Father of the Chickens." Thompson mentions the family's return to Canada in 1957-1958, and then touches briefly on events in the Congo and Nigeria, as well as the coup, when the Emperor was deposed.
Audio 280b consists of the following recording:
Thompson speaks of then end of Selassie's rule, of visiting some of the family members in prison, and of the Marxist Revolution in Ethiopia. He is asked to reminisce about Haile Selassie.

Oral History: Bob Thompson interviewed by Peter Stursberg, C 2875, 2876, 2877 cassette 8 - September 28

Digitized sound file not attached, due to copyright restrictions
As part of a joint Oral History project of the Public Archives of Canada and the Parliamentary Library, journalist, writer, and broadcaster Peter Stursberg interviewed former Social Credit leader Robert Thompson in September, 1981.
Title: "Robert N. Thompson - His Memoirs in an interview with Peter Stursberg in Dr. Thompson's office in the Robert N. Thompson Building in Trinity Western College, Langley, British Columbia, September 28, 1981. (This is part of an oral history for the Parliamentary Library and the Public Archives)"
Audio 282a consists of the following recording:
This portion of the interview opens with Thompson's concluding comments regarding the reforms of Chiang Kai-shek Stursberg attempts to pin down some dates for Thompson's visits to Vietnam and Taiwan. They speak at length about Thompson's 1973 visit to China. This recording ends with a discussion of the return of the Thompson family to Canada, and their eventual resignation from the Sudan Interior Mission (SIM).
Audio 282b consists of the following recording:
Upon the family's return to Canada, for medical reasons, Thompson did not know exactly how he would provide for his family. They moved to Red Deer, Alberta, where Thompson was contacted by Ernest Manning, who asked him to conduct a survey of public regarding Manning's possible shift into federal politics. The response was negative, so Manning suggested that Thompson consider leading the Social Credit Party. In June 1960 Thompson was elected President of the Social Credit Association of Canada. He was elected Leader of the Social Credit Party in July, 1961. Thompson then reflects on a meeting with Christian businessman Roger Kirk, which served as the catalyst which caused him to seriously consider going into politics. The party was in some disarray at the time, and finances were tight. Thompson begins to speak of the National Convention in Ottawa.

Oral History: Bob Thompson interviewed by Peter Stursberg, C 2875, 2876, 2877 cassette 9 - September 28

Digitized sound file not attached, due to copyright restrictions
As part of a joint Oral History project of the Public Archives of Canada and the Parliamentary Library, journalist, writer, and broadcaster Peter Stursberg interviewed former Social Credit leader Robert Thompson in September, 1981.
Title: "Robert N. Thompson - His Memoirs in an interview with Peter Stursberg in Dr. Thompson's office in the Robert N. Thompson Building in Trinity Western College, Langley, British Columbia, September 28, 1981. (This is part of an oral history for the Parliamentary Library and the Public Archives)"
Audio 283a consists of the following recording:
This portion of the interview picks up where Aud 282 left off, with a discussion regarding the Nationial Convention of the Social Credit Party in 1960, and Thompson's decision to run for leadership. They discuss the issue of bilingualism, the caucus, and Diefenbaker.
Audio 283b consists of the following recording:
Thompson continues to reminisce about his political career. He is asked about the "affair of the six Social Crediters," the defeat of the Diefenbaker government, and the demise of the Social Credit Party.

Oral History: Bob Thompson interviewed by Peter Stursberg, C 2872, 2873 cassette 1 - September 16

Digitized sound file not attached, due to copyright restrictions
As part of a joint Oral History project of the Public Archives of Canada and the Parliamentary Library, journalist, writer, and broadcaster Peter Stursberg interviewed former Social Credit leader Robert Thompson in September, 1981.
Title: "Robert N. Thompson - His Memoirs in an interview with Peter Stursberg in Dr. Thompson's office in the Robert N. Thompson Building in Trinity Western College, Langley, British Columbia, September 16, 1981. (This is part of an oral history for the Parliamentary Library and the Public Archives)"
Audio 275a consists of the following recording:
This portion of the interview covers Thompson's family history. He was born on May 17, 1914, in Duluth Minnesota; the family returned to Canada - to a farm in Innisfail, near Red Deer, Alberta, when he was three. Pages 4 and 5 of the transcript include the story of Thompson becoming a Canadian citizen in May 1943, by "Order-in-Council."
Audio 275b consists of the following recording:
This portion of the interview covers Thompson's school years, education, and early political development. As a school teacher, he was called on to speak at a political meeting when the scheduled speaker did not arrive on time. Immediately following, Aberhart called to encourage Thompson to become involved in politics. Thompson began teaching at the age of twenty, and was appointed by Aberhart as a youth organizer for the Social Credit Party shortly thereafter. He lists three of the "four commandments" of Social Credit. He begins to describe his reasons for entering into chiropractic training.

Oral History: Bob Thompson interviewed by Peter Stursberg, C 2875, 2876, 2877 cassette 10 - September 28

Digitized sound file not attached, due to copyright restrictions
As part of a joint Oral History project of the Public Archives of Canada and the Parliamentary Library, journalist, writer, and broadcaster Peter Stursberg interviewed former Social Credit leader Robert Thompson in September, 1981.
Title: "Robert N. Thompson - His Memoirs in an interview with Peter Stursberg in Dr. Thompson's office in the Robert N. Thompson Building in Trinity Western College, Langley, British Columbia, September 28, 1981. (This is part of an oral history for the Parliamentary Library and the Public Archives)"
Audio 284a consists of the following recording:
This portion of the interview picks up where Aud 283 left off, with a discussion regarding the "decisive meeting of the Executive and the Caucus of the Social Credit Party which led to the final split." Towards the end of the recording, Thompson is asked about the process by which he became a Conservative candidate.
Audio 284b consists of the following recording:
Thompson describes a dual convention, and several attacks on his own property and livestock. The move to BC, and to a job with Trinity Western, is briefly alluded to. Thompson is asked about his relationship with Bob Stanfield. He raises the topic of the Parliamentary Prayer Breakfasts, which crossed party lines. Near the end of this recording, Thompson begins to speak of Prime Minister Trudeau and Thompson's trip to Biafra.

Oral History: Bob Thompson interviewed by Peter Stursberg, C 2872, 2873 cassette 2 - September 16

Digitized sound file not attached, due to copyright restrictions
As part of a joint Oral History project of the Public Archives of Canada and the Parliamentary Library, journalist, writer, and broadcaster Peter Stursberg interviewed former Social Credit leader Robert Thompson in September, 1981.
Title: "Robert N. Thompson - His Memoirs in an interview with Peter Stursberg in Dr. Thompson's office in the Robert N. Thompson Building in Trinity Western College, Langley, British Columbia, September 16, 1981. (This is part of an oral history for the Parliamentary Library and the Public Archives)"
Audio 276a consists of the following recording:
This portion of the interview covers Thompson's experiences at Palmer College of Chiropractic (Davenport, Iowa), where he met his wife, Hazel Kurth. Thompson reviews his training and education, including graduate work at Jones University in South Carolina. The conversation turns to Social Credit and the CCF, and the intersection of Social Credit and religion. Thompson is asked to describe the philosophy of Social Credit and the "A + B Theorum." Thompson refers to James Douglas as "the prophet of Social Credit theory." They discuss the banking system and "prosperity certificates."
Audio 276b consists of the following recording:
This portion of the interview continues to focus on the Social Credit movement. Thompson is asked about W.A.C. Bennett and Ernest Manning, and about Aberhart's controversial "press law." He is also asked why Social Credit "succeeded provincially" but "failed federally."

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